Around the World from Your Living Room: Peru

Welcome to the 31 Days of Global Missions with Kids series! You can view all the posts in the series here. Please remember that the goal isn’t for you to do ALL these projects, but rather pick one or two. You can download a printable worksheet here to guide you through discerning which project is best for you and the young people in your life.

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Around the World from your living room - Peru

The other night after my husband came home from work, our family gathered around the table and ate a simple Peruvian dinner of chicken, rice, potatoes, and salad.

Together with our two little girls, we talked about the nation of Peru, learning some basics about their culture. We located Peru on a map (it’s in South America!) and listened to a song in Spanish. (We may have danced along with it!) Then we prayed for the people of Peru before heading to bed.

It was a sweet, meaningful, and simple time, and I’d love to empower your family to do the same.

Today I’m thrilled to share the first installment of a new resource called Around the World from Your Living Room.  It’s a simple series that I’ve put together providing resources for a meal, activity (like a craft or game), and prayer for different countries.

south america

Here’s how it works:

Your family (or small group, or Sunday school class, or whatever) gathers together for an hour or two to focus on a country.

  • You’ll prepare a simple meal together from that country, using easy-to-find, real food ingredients.
  • As you eat, you’ll learn about the country.
  • Then you’ll do a craft or play a game originating in that country.
  • Finally, you’ll gather together to spend a few moments praying for the people there.

Today I’ll be sharing a guide for Peru, and in the months to come, I’ll share about several more countries. I have traveled to Peru twice, so I was especially excited to share about Peru with my family and all of you!

Peru

Around the World from Your Living Room: Peru 

Learn about Peru:

Peru location

First, talk with your children about Peru. Look at some of these facts together. You can also view some photos of Peru from National Geographic… I particularly enjoyed the “Faces of Peru” slideshow.

Overview: Peru is a beautiful, mountainous country with a rich history, known as the seat of the Incan empire in the 1500s. Peru is famous for housing Macchu Pichu, an ancient palace for the Incas, located high in the mountains near Cusco. Most Peruvians face poverty, though for the past years they have had a good economy under good government.

Location: Peru is on the coast of South America, bordering Ecuador, Brazil, and Bolivia.

Population: 30 million people

Capital: Lima

Language: Spanish is the most common, but a small population speaks Quechua.

Major Religions:

  • 81% Roman Catholic Christians
  • 12% Evangelical Christians

Weather: Near the coast, Peru has mild weather, with warm summers and cool winters. In the mountains, it can be very cold, though there is rarely snow except on the very top of the Andes mountains. Peru is located south of the Equator, which means summertime happens in December/January/February and wintertime happens in June/July/August.

(Many of this information was found at the CIA World Factbook).

A Simple Meal: Chicken, Rice, Fries, and Salad

peruvian food

Peru is known for many delicious foods, but a typical every day meal includes chicken, rice, potatoes, and salad… plus perhaps some Inka Cola soda to wash it down.

Roasted chicken. You can make a roasted chicken yourself (a whole chicken or just parts like the legs and thighs). Here’s a recipe I like (but you can skip seasoning it two days ahead).

We purchased a whole chicken from El Pollo Loco (a fast food chain in our area), or a rotisserie chicken from your grocery store works, too.

French Fries  

Did you know potatoes originated in Peru? (Not Ireland!)

Here is a recipe for baked French fries.

I sliced two potatoes lengthwise into “French fry” shapes, tossed them in some olive oil, then put them in the oven on 400*.  But, I had to go pick up the chicken… so, I just turned off the oven a few minutes into cooking, and let the potatoes sit inside for 30+ minutes while we were gone. They turned out great!

Salad

Chop up some iceberg/romaine lettuce for a salad. Top with shredded carrots and tomatoes.

For dressing, you can make this cilantro avocado dressing… or if you go to El Pollo Loco, just ask for a side of their avocado dressing – it’s very similar!

Alternatively, look for a bottled avocado and/or cilantro dressing (Trader Joe’s carries a cilantro dressing in their refrigerated section.) Or just use ranch!

Rice

Make a batch of white rice using your normal method. We use a rice cooker.

If you are willing to spend a little more time on it, this simple recipe for Peruvian white rice with garlic and lemon juice sounds delicious.

Even if you usually eat brown rice (we do!), I highly recommend white rice so it’s a more “authentic” experience.

Optional: Inka Cola

Your local grocery store may carry Inka Cola, especially if you live in an area with a larger Latino population. I found some at Target.

Inka Cola is a staple of Peruvian culture. It is a caffeinated, BRIGHT yellow soda and tastes just like bubble gum.

We didn’t buy any for our dinner because my husband hates bubble gum flavoring and our girls are too little for soda yet. But, it will definitely give your meal a genuine Peruvian flavor!

Alternative: Check if you have a Peruvian restaurant in your town… many communities do!

Hands-on Activity: Nazca Line Pictures

nazca spider

The Nazca lines are a famous location in Peru featuring incredible, huge sand drawings of animals and shapes, somehow created by an ancient civilization. To learn more about the Nazca lines, click here.

The Nazca lines were likely made as an offering to ancient gods. You could talk with your children about how we worship the One True God. You could talk about creating your art project to worship God, our Creator.

nazcalines craft directions

Inspired by this site, we made sand pictures in honor of the Nazca Lines.

  1. Look at photos of the Nazca Lines. You can look at this page for examples (or just google “how to draw the Nazca lines” and view the images that appear.
  2. Have your child draw a picture with a pencil or marker. Younger children can draw any shape; older children may want to draw an animal that looks like the Nazca lines.
  3. Trace over the drawing with glue. (You may want to do this on behalf of younger children.)
  4. Sprinkle sand (of any color) over the glue, then shake it off into a trash can or a piece of paper.  Let dry.

Tip: We didn’t have any sand, so I actually used unsweetened Kool-aid mix instead. It worked at first, when it dried, it “melted” a bit. My preschooler wasn’t picky, but an older child may prefer the precision of colored sand.

peru coloring page

Alternative: you could just print out this cute llama coloring page and color it.

Pray for Peru:

praying for Peru

As a family, spend a few minutes praying for Peru. If you have a globe or world map, locate Peru and have each family member place a finger on (or near) the country. You can lead the prayer, or invite each family member to pray about a specific request.

Your prayer time does not need to be lengthy! Don’t feel intimidated by thinking you need to pray for 10-20 minutes or more. Just a couple minutes focused on these requests, or others that come to mind, is fine.

  • Economy: The economy in Peru has been improving, but 25% of Peruvians still live in poverty, surviving in shanty-towns without electricity, running water, or other basics. Pray for job opportunities and for hope for the people there.
  • Religion: Many Peruvians are Roman Catholic Christians, but not all are actively practicing in their faith. Pray that Jesus would be a real, daily presence in their lives.
  • Health: Malnutrition rates in Peru have been dropping, thanks to government campaigns to teach good hygiene and provide clean water. Pray that this continues!
  • History: The Quechua are a native tribal group (you might think of them as “Native Americans” or “American Indians.”) Missionaries have worked hard to translate the Bible into their language and to bring Christ to this group, and God is transforming the Quechua! Pray that He would continue to be known among them. (I found this request on Operation World).
  • Ministry: Pray for local Peruvians who are reaching out within their own country, offering physical and spiritual support. Pray for the ministry of Krochet Kids as they provide jobs making knit hats and help support a community among the women who work there.

For additional prayer requests, visit Operation World.

Additional Resources and Ideas:

  • The Goodfellow Family works with Krochet Kids in Peru. Their blog has many pictures about their life in Peru, both every day life and their travels around the country.
  • Listen to Spanish worship music. When I visited Peruvian churches on a mission trip, I loved these two songs: “Te Alabare Mi Buen Jesus” and “Tu Eres Todopoderoso.” If you know basic Spanish, you will probably understand part of the songs (Alabare = worship/praise & todopoderoso = all powerful). I highly recommend dancing along. 🙂

Tell me about your experiences!

Did you spend an evening focused on Peru?

I would love to see your photos or hear about your experiences! Leave a comment below or share your photos using the hashtag #AroundtheWorldfromYourLivingRoom.

This Global Missions with Kids series is full of thoughts and practical ideas for serving Christ alongside your children and teenagers.