Don’t Leave Jesus Hanging on the Cross

Don't Leave Jesus Hanging on the Cross: An Important Tip for Teaching Children

As we observe the season of Lent, I’ve been thinking about how careful we need to be to not “leave Jesus hanging on the cross” as we talk about His death and resurrection with the young children in our lives.

I’ve hesitated writing this post because the last thing I want to do is make someone feel self-conscious or sad about doing this in the past. Let me be the first to say that I don’t always do this perfectly! And, if you are someone who has never thought about this issue before, please don’t stress about it. Here’s just something to think about going forward: Don’t leave Jesus on the cross!

Here’s what I mean:

In the Church, especially around Easter, we have a tendency to focus on our sin and on the sadness and sorrow of Good Friday and the crucifixion.  Rightly, we want people to understand their sin and need for a Savior.

For example:

  • Talking about our sins and all the things we’ve done wrong and how Jesus died on the cross to redeem our sins.
  • Writing our sins down on a piece of paper and hammering them into a wooden cross.

But, we have to be careful with children to not “stay” in that zone, for two reasons:

  1. Children don’t have the same time concept as adults. My 3 -year-old still can’t quite remember the difference between yesterday and tomorrow. She can’t always recall a conversation I had with her earlier today. While this will obviously get better, even elementary school children don’t have a superb sense of time, in the same way teenagers and adults do.
  2. Until around age 12, children are not abstract thinkers. They need things concretely explained to them. When we do an activity like “nailing our sins to the cross” (by writing a sin on a piece of paper), they can’t retain that activity over the course of two days from Good Friday to Easter Sunday. They’re not processing that symbolism the same way adults do.

So, here’s a general rule when working with children, I would say all the way up through age 12 or so:

Don’t leave Jesus on the cross. If you talk about the crucifixion, talk about the resurrection in the next breath. If you lead an activity about sin and death, wrap it up with a component describing His victory from the grave.

In our family, I try to make sure we always say something like, “Jesus died on the cross and rose again on Easter,” rather than simply talking about Jesus dying on the cross and leaving it at that.

After all, what’s the value of His death on the cross if we don’t remember He rose again on Easter morning?

I want the victory of Easter to be ingrained in the minds and hearts of the children I teach.

Here’s a wonderful post about Making the Most of Easter with Young Kids that explains more about not leaving Jesus on the cross.

What about Crucifixes?

I want to be sensitive to any Catholic Christian readers of Faith Passed Down. I understand there are reasons for crucifixes depicting Jesus on the cross, and I’m not trying to demean that practice.

Just make sure that as you view a cross with Jesus hanging on it with your young children, you point out that He’s not on the cross anymore – we can remember our sins and also remember that He rose victorious from the grave!